Manhattan Express | Archive | Arts

Home » Archives by category » Arts

World Music Enlivens Carnegie Family Program

World Music Enlivens Carnegie Family Program

BY ALEXANDRA SIMON | Haitian songstress Emeline Michel will perform a few of her classic hits at Carnegie Hall on Dec. 16 in a special program geared to young children. The singer is performing at “My City, My Song,” a family-oriented show that is part of Carnegie’s Musical Explorers program — an in-class musical education segment […]

Alvin Ailey’s City Center Engagement Enthralls

Alvin Ailey’s City Center Engagement Enthralls

BY DUSICA SUE MALESEVIC | Alvin Ailey’s “Revelations,” 57 years on, is, well, still a revelation. Performed as part of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s 2017 season at New York City Center, the piece — created when the choreographer was just 29 — feels as fresh and as relevant as ever, and certainly got […]

The Pool Man’s Joy

The Pool Man’s Joy

BY DAVID NOH | The one emotion that you come away with from the David Hockney retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art — and, indeed, that you experience all through your viewing of it — is joy. He is living proof that great art needn’t be dark, tortured, or full of angst. Hockney comes instead […]

Strange Bedfellows

Strange Bedfellows

BY DAVID KENNERLEY | It’s a good thing “The Parisian Woman,” Beau Willimon’s talky new drama about politics and power, has no intermission. Because it takes nearly an hour to build up a decent head of steam, and if there were a break, I expect there’d be more than a few empty seats in the […]

Boys and The Band

Boys and The Band

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE |  I think everyone in their roster of friends knows someone like Gerry. (I can tick off at least three.) Gerry is the kind of oversized neurotic who blows into a room like a tornado and promptly sucks all the air out of it. Every sentence feels like a performance, and it’s […]

Anime NYC Revives a Lost Niche

Anime NYC Revives a Lost Niche

BY CHARLES BATTERSBY | New York has a major Comic Con but, in years past there was also a con just for Japanese comics and cartoons. The old New York Anime Festival was absorbed into the New York Comic Con (NYCC) five years ago, leaving the city’s nerdy Japanophiles without a major con they could […]

A Finn Has the Immigrant Speak

A Finn Has the Immigrant Speak

BY STEVE ERICKSON | It’s often proclaimed today that every minority group should be the first in line to make films about themselves — and straight, white, Christian, cisgender men should be the last to make films about people other than themselves. There’s some justification for this perspective that goes beyond simply the historical entitlement […]

Match Play

Match Play

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE | Julia Cho’s complex and engrossing new play “Office Hour,” now at the Public, is a boldly theatrical examination of a harrowing, contemporary issue: random violence, or more to the point, the fear of random violence and its impact on our culture. Dennis is a creative writing student at a college where […]

R.E.M.’s Pinnacle, A Quarter Century On

R.E.M.’s Pinnacle, A Quarter Century On

BY STEVE ERICKSON | At the time “Automatic For the People” came out in 1992, I had abandoned my earlier fandom of R.E.M. — who helped popularize college radio in the ‘80s and pave the way for the commercial success of grunge and indie rock in the ‘90s — because hits like “Stand” and “Shiny […]

My Life Differently

My Life Differently

BY STEVE ERICKSON | Prolific South Korean director Hong Sang-soo’s “On the Beach At Night Alone” reflects on the failed relationship of a woman named Younghee (Kim Minhee) with a well-known filmmaker. It says something about Hong’s degree of self-critique and distance from standard male fantasies that he wrote a script that reflects the life he […]

Page 1 of 16123Next ›Last »