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Hail, Caesar!

Hail, Caesar!

Corey Stoll as Brutus and John Douglas Thompson as Cassius in the Public Theater production of “Julius Caesar.” | JOAN MARCUS BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE | Despite the dazzling, thoughtful, and often moving production of “Julius Caesar” now in Central Park, it is virtually impossible to discuss the Public Theater’s staging of the Shakespeare classic without acknowledging […]

Music and Art

Music and Art

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE | Stripping down Sondheim is a trend this season, and theater is much better for it. On the heels of the artfully shaved “Sweeney Todd,” still packing the diminutive house at the Barrow Street Theatre, comes CSC’s comparably pared down mounting of “Pacific Overtures.” In both cases, the reductions serve the pieces […]

DEVO’s Mark Mothersbaugh at Grey Art

DEVO’s Mark Mothersbaugh at Grey Art

BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN | While a founding member of the pioneering band DEVO, Mark Mothersbaugh has also been a visual artist since the early 1970s. Over several decades, he has amassed a prodigious body of work consisting of paintings, prints, photographs, sculpture, wildly inventive musical instruments of his own design, decorative arts, film, film scores, and […]

Theater for Grownups

Theater for Grownups

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE | Satire typically does not age well. Particularly in the theater, as times, society, and fashions change, new targets emerge and once-pointed plays become arcane curiosities. Happily, that is not the case with the still-trenchant and thoroughly engaging revival of “Six Degrees of Separation.” Twenty-seven years ago, John Guare’s play was a wry […]

Dubious Recipe for Love

Dubious Recipe for Love

BY DAVID KENNERLEY | Although the York Theatre Company is famous for carefully nurturing brand new musicals (its boffo hit “Cagney” has been running Off-Broadway for over a year), its latest effort, “Marry Harry,” feels decades old. In this case, that’s not such a bad thing. For the winsome romantic comedy, despite being set in […]

America’s True Native Fashion

America’s True Native Fashion

BY LENORE SKENAZY | When you think about Native Americans and fashion, your first thought might be “Beads.” (Well, at least mine was.) Wait, no. Feathers! No— buckskin with fringe. What’s more Native American than buckskin pants worn by some high-cheeked hunter about to shoot a deer? Well how about a Louis Vuitton arrow quiver? That […]

Foxy Ladies

Foxy Ladies

BY DAVID KENNERLEY | Lillian Hellman’s “The Little Foxes” has one of the juiciest female roles in American theater: Regina Giddens, a greedy matriarch conniving for control of the family cotton business in Alabama at the turn of the 20th century. None other than Tallulah Bankhead originated the Broadway role; in revivals, Anne Bancroft, Elizabeth Taylor, […]

Phillipa Soo Sparks Sweet, Modest Tale

Phillipa Soo Sparks Sweet, Modest Tale

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE | The new musical “Amélie” would be perfect for a first date. It’s endearing, not too demanding, and with the magnificent Phillipa Soo in the title role stages a charm crusade that is nigh irresistible. That may seem like damning with faint praise, but “Amélie” makes little pretense of having big ambitions. Rather, […]

Empress of Pop Sings City Center

Empress of Pop Sings City Center

BY DAVID NOH | Diana Ross — diva of divas, from a day when the real thing existed — is coming to town! On April 24 – 29, she will be in residence at City Center for a series of concerts that will give both old and new fans a chance to revel in all […]

Love In a World Collapsing

Love In a World Collapsing

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE | Given its original decade on Broadway and the passion its fans have for “Miss Saigon,” criticism is as pointless as it is effete. Rather, the revival of the 1989 blockbuster now at the Broadway Theatre, as with the current production of “Cats” and the recent return of “Les Misérables,” provides an […]

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