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Tangible and Social: Virtual Reality at Tribeca Immersive

Tangible and Social: Virtual Reality at Tribeca Immersive

BY CHARLES BATTERSBY | The stereotype of Virtual Reality (VR) is an isolated person sitting alone in a room, their head sealed within a helmet, master of a lonesome utopia. Early efforts at VR often met this cliché — but the “Tribeca Immersive” programming at the Tribeca Film Festival aims to make virtual reality a more tangible […]

Tribeca’s Rich Offering of Queer Cinema

Tribeca’s Rich Offering of Queer Cinema

BY GARY M. KRAMER | The Tribeca Film Festival, unspooling at half a dozen Lower Manhattan venues April 18-29, features several LGBTQ films and filmmakers. While not every queer-focused title was available for preview, a handful of features, documentaries, shorts, and special programs were. One of the highlights of this year’s fest is the world premiere […]

Adrift in the Colonies

Adrift in the Colonies

BY STEVE ERICKSON | Two things describe Argentine director Lucrecia Martel’s characters: they’re never really alone and the help others offer them is rarely truly benign. Her debut, “La Ciénaga,” showed an extended family going to seed and placing themselves unknowingly in danger over the course of a humid summer. It borrowed from Renoir and Altman […]

Soderbergh Bets Again on the Movie House

Soderbergh Bets Again on the Movie House

BY STEVE ERICKSON | An experiment with contemporary technology steeped in an equally trendy suspicion of the modern world, Steven Soderbergh’s “Unsane” is the second feature-length film shot entirely on an iPhone, after Sean Baker’s great trans comedy-drama “Tangerine.” At first, the cinematography seems slightly fuzzy and blurred, but one soon adjusts. However, the portability of […]

A Heroine Too Too

A Heroine Too Too

BY STEVE ERICKSON | Moments in Ava DuVernay’s “A Wrinkle in Time,” adapted from Madeleine L’Engle’s classic 1962 children’s novel, are stunning, especially in their use of color. Yet in the end, this is the kind of film that feels the need to have a soundtrack featuring Sade literally serenading its heroine telling her she’s “the […]

Hell’s Kitchen Cinematic Pockets Give Grit to “Jessica Jones”

Hell’s Kitchen Cinematic Pockets Give Grit to “Jessica Jones”

BY DUSICA SUE MALESEVIC | Whether it’s a blended scotch or bourbon, former superhero turned private eye Jessica Jones is never far from a bottle. So where does the protagonist procure the hard stuff? From Sonny’s Grocery, of course, a longtime Hell’s Kitchen bodega that was turned into a liquor store for the second season […]

Intimate Look at AIDS’ Toll on an LA Couple

Intimate Look at AIDS’ Toll on an LA Couple

BY GARY M. KRAMER | The “Film Comment Selects” series at the Film Society of Lincoln Center is having a 25th anniversary screening of “Silverlake Life: The View from Here” on February 25 at 4:30 pm. This powerful documentary, co-directed by Tom Joslin and Peter Friedman, was filmed in 1990, but released in 1993. It candidly presents […]

Kiarostami’s Final Scene

Kiarostami’s Final Scene

BY STEVE ERICKSON | “24 Frames” actually consists of 24 four-and-a-half-minute non-narrative short films made by the late Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami. In 2016, three years into production on the project — created using software with the aid of visual effects supervisor Ali Kamali — Kiarostami passed away and the film was completed in post-production under […]

Less Than the Sum of Its Parts

Less Than the Sum of Its Parts

BY GARY M. KRAMER | Writer and director François Ozon’s new film “Double Lover” plays with his favorite twinned themes of secret lives and shifting identities. Adapted from the Joyce Carol Oates novel “Lives of the Twins” (which the author wrote under a pseudonym), the film has Chloé (Marine Vacth) seeking help from Paul Meyer […]

An Idiosyncratic, Skewed Take on 1968

An Idiosyncratic, Skewed Take on 1968

BY STEVE ERICKSON | Brazilian director João Moreira Salles’ sprawling documentary “In the Intense Now,” which could be summed up as a chronicle of the worldwide political revolts of 1968, begins with the promise of hope, change, and revolution. It ends with death, despair, and a Portuguese-language pop song whose singer urges the listener to put […]

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